Follow

“Aggressiveness decreases whereas creativity, life satisfaction, and individualism increase as one moves closer to either the North or South Pole.”
I wouldn't put much confidence in conclusions like these yet, but it's something many of us have suspected for some time: that latitude (ie, climate) influences psychological and social traits.
journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/1

@tripu
Maybe harsher conditions require more teamwork and rational behavior, while easier conditions allow more time competing for sexual dominance?

@kot @tripu Harsher in what way? I don't know if it's easier to live in Subsaharan Africa than in Norway... Higher latitudes perhaps go through more extreme changes during the year and require more different adaptations. Also, according to Jared Diamond's theory, higher latitudes allowed for longer distance travel and commerce, and more diverse cultural exchange.

@ImperfectIdea @kot The spot in Subsaharan Africa that is furthest from the Equator (Cape of Good Hope) is only 34° (S), while the Southern-most part of Norway (Kristiansand) is already 58° (N). So all other things being equal (and of course they are not), according to this theory, Norwegians would be naturally less aggressive, more creative and individualistic, and more content with their lives than South Africans. This result isn't obviously true, but it isn't necessarily surprising, either.

Sign in to participate in the conversation
Mastodon for Tech Folks

This Mastodon instance is for people interested in technology. Discussions aren't limited to technology, because tech folks shouldn't be limited to technology either! We adhere to an adapted version of the TootCat Code of Conduct and have documented a list of blocked instances. Ash is the admin and is supported by Fuzzface, Brian!, and Daniel Glus as moderators. Hosting costs are largely covered by our generous supporters on Patreon – thanks for all the help!