Can we please agree not to call apples "oranges" just because we like how "oranges" sound, and we also happen to like apples?

These are different kinds of fruit, and calling one using the name for the other is simply misleading.

Same with "anti-capitalist licenses" being called "open-source licenses".

They're not. They're different. The difference matters - if it didn't, there would be no reason not to use open-source licenses!

@bookwyrm is not "open source" (doesn't mean bad!):
github.com/bookwyrm-social/boo

@rysiek @bookwyrm >not "open source"
...it is? Unless those quotation marks change the meaning significantly in a way that I'm unaware of.
That project definitely doesn't seem to be *free*, though.

@vyivel @bookwyrm it is not open-source software. Open-source software has a very clear definition: software available on one of the licenses that are OSI-approved.

Bookwyrm's license is *not* OSI-approved.

Again, that doesn't necessarily mean it's "bad". But it does, in fact, mean it's not open-source.

@rysiek @vyivel @bookwyrm A terrible fucking take. The meaning of words does not depend on institutions. Language is descriptive, not prescriptive.
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@Hyolobrika @vyivel @bookwyrm and describing an apple as "orange citrus fruit" is bonkers. Regardless if there is an institution that provided a definition for apples and oranges, or not.

But thanks for being the first person to f-bomb this conversation. It's an achievement, as heated as this thread got in a few places, nobody felt the need to throw around expletives.

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