Unpopular opinion: is not hard to learn, people are just lazy af.

tip No. 12-gazillion:

Never ever add generated stuff to a git repository when ALL things one needs to generate the stuff are IN the repository!

How to propose a new for an project you just joined?
Like... socially acceptable...

Today, I will be teaching branches.

Lets see how this works out ...

is pretty powerful

Can we please have an equivalent in FLOSS hosting services like and ?

Today, teaching was really nice. Next week will be the continuation of today's basics.

Today I am teaching a few people

Guess what? I am not starting with git itself, but with "version control" as a concept first. These people are apprentices at my employer and I think teaching them about why we want to do VC is more beneficial than just teaching them git right away - because one first needs to learn why a tool is helpful and _then_ the tool itself, not the other way round.

What'd you think?

Things you don't want to read in any guidelines:

"...the merger is responsible..."

has a plugin, that is really cool... but the plugin is not yet as usable as I'd like it to be.

I merged a bunch of stuff.

The merges did work, although the code is broken afterwards (cargo check fails)

* git bisect start
* git bisect good master
* git bisect bad HEAD
* git bisect run cargo check

Now something for you professionals: I want to reword a few commits in a branch with an interactive rebase. But in the interactive rebase, I want to see the diff in my editor. How to?

Every now and then I get some "git sucks" comments in my timeline, but never ever have I seen one that actually lists some reasons (that is, facts and not opinions).

I conclude that is the best.

Thanks to the awesome tooling and a clean commit history, I just fixed a really nasty bug in my codebase here at work.

That shows how valuable a clean commit history is!

Is there a hack to tell to automatically do the right thing if I `git checkout master` and the project moved to `main`?

Why can't people obey these simple message rules?

* Use an uppercase letter for the start of your subject line
* EXPLAIN what you did, not "Fixes"

I love sending patches via . But I _always_ mess up one detail.

This time: Subject prefix missing a word.

Projects that use but commit things like "Update" or "Fix things".

🤮

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