I came across a rather peculiar implementation of a string repeat function for JavaScript.

There's a built-in for this since ES2015, and prior to that, the following was a common idom:

> str = "x"
> count = 3
> out = (new Array(count + 1).join(str)

But, an MDN contributor thought - we can optimize this! Can you figure out how and why it works?

👉 codepen.io/Krinkle/pen/abmrLdz

fun, uspol 

Tom Hanks, on soundcheck at today's "Celebrating America" post-inauguration event.

"""
check, check, Sibilance.

ATTENTION. GODZILLA IS COMING.
"""

Nice recall to his Aerosmith SNL sketch 🤘

Wikipedia.org and sister projects, by operating system after December 2020:

* 30.4%: Android
* 27.0%: Windows
* 25.6%: iOS
* (8.7%: Other)
* 7.0%: macOS
* 0.8%: Linux (incl. Ubuntu)
* 0.5%: Chrome OS

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Wikipedia.org and sister projects, stats for December 2020:

* 49%: Chrome, Chrome Mobile
* 26%: Safari, Mobile Safari
* 4.9%: Firefox, Firefox Mobile
* 2.7%: Samsung Internet
* 2.3%: Edge
* 2.0%: Chrome Mobile iOS
* 1.9%: Google app
* 0.91%: Internet Explorer
* 0.76%: Opera

100% = 16.4 billion page views (desktop+mobile web, no apps, no bots)

"Profiling live Wikipedia traffic with near-zero overhead"

> Each day of Wikipedia backend traffic yields about 3 million stack trace samples, as collected by Excimer, a new a low-overhead sampling profiler for PHP.

I wrote all about it in this year's Performance Calendar:

👉 calendar.perfplanet.com/2020/p

By operating system for November 2020:

* 29.8%: Android
* 27.7%: Windows
* 25.0%: iOS
* (9.8%: Other)
* 6.8%: macOS
* 0.5%: Linux (incl. Ubuntu)
* 0.4%: Chrome OS

References:

* Explore the data:
** analytics.wikimedia.org/dashbo
** Query on stats.wikimedia.org: w.wiki/ozJ

* Raw data:
** analytics.wikimedia.org/publis
** wikitech.wikimedia.org/wiki/An

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Wikipedia.org and sister project stats for November 2020:

* 49%: Chrome, Chrome Mobile
* 24%: Safari, Mobile Safari
* 5.0%: Firefox, Firefox Mobile
* 2.6%: Samsung Internet
* 2.4%: Edge
* 2.2%: Google app
* 1.8%: Chrome Mobile iOS
* 1.1%: Internet Explorer
* 0.77%: Opera

100% = 16.7 billion page views (desktop+mobile web, no apps, no bots)

A collegue of mine ran into this some interesting code behaviour today. I encountered this before, but didn't realize it was still a thing. Fun times!

Can you guess what caused the string to become an integer?

👉 3v4l.org/odIiW

"How life works in Antarctica" by Wendover

Mini-docu on how it is to live (and work) at our South Pole. Some takeaways:

- Network speeds are limited to 38 kbit/s (!) most of the day. Almost on par with 90s telephone dial-up.
- Rescue operations are harder than for the ISS in outer space. They're cut off 9 months a year.
- It remains the only covid-free continent.

Nebula: watchnebula.com/videos/wendove
YT: youtu.be/ZAEydOjNWyQ

"Europe vs USA Broadband Performance (2020 Report)"

From FairInternetReport:
> American internet users have had a very good 2020: […] median Internet speeds doubled [from] 17.34mbps in 2019 to 33.16mbps in 2020 […] increased 91%.
>
> US average broadband speeds overtook western EU countries […] for the first time in 5 years.
>
> The US stills lags behind many European and developed nations […]
> Italy continues to have the worst internet in the EU, […]

fairinternetreport.com/researc

Wikipedia.org and sister project stats for October 2020:

* 49%: Chrome, Chrome Mobile
* 24%: Safari, Mobile Safari
* 5.1%: Firefox, Firefox Mobile
* 2.6%: Samsung Internet
* 2.3%: Edge
* 2.2%: Google app
* 1.7%: Chrome Mobile iOS
* 1.3%: Internet Explorer

100% = 16.3 billion page views (desktop+mobile web, non-spider/bot)

Fiddling with Wikidata to get a list of Wikipedia articles about known persons that have died of covid, sorted by date and age.

w.wiki/jcv

Celeb death 

Sean Connery died in his sleep last night, at the age of 90 (1930-2020). The end of an era. Farewell!

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sean_Con

As of 2018, the US birth rate is approximately 0.455 Miles per hour.

Data source: ssa.gov/oact/babynames/limits.
H/T 🐦️ lunasorcery

wind turbine fail, 30s video 

Took place in a suburban area near Djursland, Denmark in 2008.

courtesy of YouTube recommending this 12 year old video to everyone today: youtu.be/oAWMpxX60KM

"Making of a Myth", behind Kubrick's 2001 A Space Odyssey.

This excerpt is about how they made the pan float, in 1968, without Chroma-key technology. How did Kubrick's FX team do it?

Full Channel 4 documentary:
youtube.com/watch?v=F7HGwVqI_F

This aspect was also covered in the 7-part "How Kubrick made 2001" series:
youtube.com/watch?v=StZ2fmWYom

From Liam O:

> A year ago, nathanwright120 made an edit to [to] indicates that a building in Melbourne had 212 floors instead of 2. […] other edits seem legit, so it appears to have been a typo.
> The error was corrected by another user, BUT, in the interim, Microsoft took an export [for] Flight Simulator 2020.
> The result... this incredible monolith

Further reporting by Igor Bonifacic for Engadget:

engadget.com/flight-simulator-

🐦 twitter.com/liamosaur/status/1

On January 15th, Wikipedia flipped the switch to discard invalid prefixes on its network transit links.

Article by Arzhel Younsi (Net Ops at Wikimedia Foundation).

phabricator.wikimedia.org/pham

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