After decades of chasing my "talent" and taking any resistance at any activity as a sign that I'm untalented and destined to fail, this thing is wildly liberating. Input work → output results. No talent, no natural affinity. Just f*ing work.

@ellotheth
I'm with you, for real. I've been playing guitar for a long time. My cousin once said that I was lucky to have been born with talent. That he could practice night and day and never be as good as me. But the fact is, I'm only good because I DID practice night and day. And he would have been too if he had also practiced regularly.

@Montesboogie Talent *is* a thing, but I've found it more stressful than liberating. It makes me compare my abilities to others' in ways that aren't healthy or productive. Biking (for me) is about getting better, not proving that I'm already great. My current baseline is X, and if I put in the work, it will improve to Y. It doesn't matter how much talent I have; that line is going to up and to the right regardless. (My body will hit a physical limit eventually, but it'll be a while.)

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