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@mdszy That feeling, yeah. Whenever something like that happens to me I start to wonder if I accidentally solved a different, easier problem.

P means pending, not poem. Red P means it's gone beyond the average response time. Is that good? Bad? Probably just means the mostly-volunteer staff of the journal is overwhelmed.

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Some sample literary journal wait times from my Duotrope submission tracker page. Basically, it's normal to wait six months, only to get a form rejection at the end.

It's weird to me how many jobs for technical writers specify they want someone with experience writing in a content management system. That's so trivially easy to learn, why do you need to screen for it? Unless they mean something weird and secretive by it and not just like, for example, Drupal.

Can any of you recommend a good source that explains destructuring in ES6? I think I'm having more trouble with the syntax than the concept. However, it's possible I'm not grokking the concept as well and that's why the quirks of the syntax feel arbitrary.

Can any of you recommend a good source that explains destructuring in ES6? I think I'm having more trouble with the syntax than the concept. However, it's possible I'm not grokking the concept as well and that's why the quirks of the syntax feel arbitrary.

@migurski I had not thought of doing that. It's a good idea, actually. Self-taught always leaves conceptual gaps.

It turns out I had somehow picked up the concept of functional programming without knowing what it was called, and in pretty much every new section there's a bit that makes me go "oh so that's what that is/how that works/why that doesn't work"

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Now freeCodeCamp has split up the JS teaching section into Basic, JavaScript, ES6, Regular Expressions, Debugging
Basic Data Structures, Object Oriented Programming, and Functional Programming. Projects and more advanced challenges are interspersed. I'm going back through and filling in what I missed.

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The freeCodeCamp curriculum really beefed up their JavaScript section. It was a bit circle-circle-owl when I did it - by which I mean you get basic ES5 concepts and then here's some algorithm challenges, good luck!

Which was very frustrating and difficult and I definitely missed some foundational concepts learning that way.

As part of my JS review I'm reminded about how silly some of the built-in function names are. Like Array.unshift() adds an item to the front of the array. WTF. I mean you get used to it if you're using it all the time. After a three month break, the ridiculousness becomes super obvious though.

It also makes me think that most people and programs teaching programming don't actually base their curriculum enough on cognitive science, and that's why learning programming is so hard. It's not intrinsically harder than learning a human language or calculus. But we teach it very poorly.

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I'm reviewing my JavaScript and general programming concepts for a technical interview and the lecture gave me some ideas about how to do my review and made me wish I had known more about this stuff when I was first learning JavaScript.

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Lecture, with slides, from a recent Write the Docs meetup
Human Learning: How we Learn, Why it Matters
youtube.com/watch?v=s2wKB961_f

Useful if you're trying to learn something, or to teach people something. Based on scientific study of cognition and learning rather than popular but disproven myths like "learning styles".

"We already have nice things, and other reasons not to write in-house ops tools"

opensource.com/article/18/10/n

(good article by a v smart acquaintance of mine about why you shouldn't home-cook your ops tools, which reminded me of the earlier musing about what I see as drawbacks of a headless CMS)

when I first ran D&D, my grandmother, who had bought fully into the IT'S SATANISM hype, insisted on sitting and watching the first session

about an hour in, she threw her hands up and yelled 'THIS IS JUST MATH' and stormed off

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