@nikolal never. I didn't find any special use to it since I have a stable kernel installed and never really had big problems unless I fuck things up myself. People usually make snapshots often if they're working on some driver or the kernel itself or are maintaining a server and they need to have a snapshot of a working setup to revert to in minutes/seconds. I don't really find it useful or worth my time for personal computers.

@musicmatze I think you could do that with edit option for a commit on which you want to stop. It allows you to edit a commit (even it's contents) and I guess you could then see the diff you wan't. After you're done just amend the commit and continue the rebase. When you're amending the commit, you can change the commit message.

@nikolal I'm not really sure what you mean. Is this something contraversial? I see it like a company that has already invested in education buying another company which is sort of in education category that could be profitable for them. Not really something I see as a problem. I didn't read the full article of course so keep that in mind.

@kev they are working on it now with that new package manager but I think it's gonna be a lot of time until developers start packaging applications for that or it becomes a common practice. Linux is not perfect regsrding package management but so far, I've had much better experience with Linux.

@kev two words, package management. On Linux, pms make it soooo east to handle packages and upgrades, especially on servers. Put a packamanager into the base os and suddenly you don't need whole collections of programs to manage the system rather just a few commands or a simple shell script (not even bash). This is more server/technical user oriented opinion but that's basically why I use Linux. If Windows had that and was easy to deal with, I might've even used Windows.

@robey Everything is very slowly moving towards TS but until most of new libraries and majority of current most important libraries are transfered to TS, they will use JS because they can.

@robey I guess for the same reason they still use Java and C++ for servers when you have Golang and Rust. Usually it's just that they either don't want to learn another language or the business they work in doesn't want to make a switch from something that they definitely works to something that they don't know if it will work.

Posted originally on twitter, automatically crossposted to Mastodon 

@celia is there any specific reason why you're looking for women developers? I'm genuinely interested 😁

Those people then preach Rust as a solution to everything while they don't understand it fully. I agree that there is no such thing as a perfect programmer, but I also think that whatever the tool is, programmers can still write crappy code. Tool doesn't make a programmer better and people need to stop advertising Rust like that. Maybe you have other experience but this is what I've seen.

@robey @OCRbot I agree that there is no such thing as a programmer that doesn't make bugs. Rust is far better that most of the languages in terms of memory safety and it was about time that something like that was created. One thimg that I always get upset with it that I know many (and I really mean a lot) peaple that when they hear Rust is memory safe, they say oh that's great, I would just learn Rust and don't care about making bugs beacuse you "can't make them in Rust".

@celia I agree with Charles. I have several friends that are quite older than me (I'm in early 20s and they are in their 50s). Most of things they have trouble with today is learning new technologies. There is far too many things ot learn in order to make something very simple. Add to that that they need to figure out which tecnology they wan't to pick. It's the same on both backend and frontend. Just seems like everything is so bloated and you really need to know everything.

rootless docker, forum post 

@celia rootful docker does that.

rootless docker, forum post 

@celia redhat.com/sysadmin/image-stor This is a link to the post about podman. IMO if you use Docker, you should either use rootless and have different dirs for each user or use "rootful" and add users to the docker group. Another option is to host an image repository locally (at your home) so you can quickly pull images that you want to use. That wouldn't share any volumes between users but if you wan't to share volumes...

rootless docker, forum post 

@celia from what I know, idea of rootless docker is to spearate image storage, volumes and containers between users. It is not intended to share the same root directory between two users. It is basically not possible to do that as you've seen with docker setting 711 persissions. Podman has some ways to share images (only images, not volumes) between users by creating storage dir that can be accessed by multiple users.

@danarel they've (Arch) added a new repo, Gnome-unstable, which contains some v40 updates. They seem to be trying out how everything works together before releasing it as stable. I usually wait a fiew days, especially on drastic updates like these, for everything to settle down in order to mizimize the possibility for crashes.

@celia you could also just use Docker in "rootful" mode and add your user to the docker group. Imo, it's fine for a local setup but you probably won't be doing that on servers.

@yarmo and less prone to breaking. On Ubunutu I've usually had to reinstall if I wanted to update to the next version whereas on Fedora, updates just work. Arch is neat in that perspective since it's a rolling release (basically no os versions, just packages that are constantly being updated) however that in rare cases can cause instability (more often than on other distros).

@yarmo on the topic of needing a change, I'd like to chime in. I also felt that at some point after using Ubuntu for 2-3 years. I've run Debian and Arch a cuple of times but mostly stuvk on Ubunutu. Currently I'm using Manjaro (probably going to switch ti Arch) and Fedora. Fedora is an excellent pick for developers and researchers (a lot of scientific programs in official repos). I really like it and actually prefer it over Ubuntu because in my experience it's less buggy and...

@nikolal Igor Pavlov (developer of 7zip) indicated in one comment that 7zip for Linux would have the same license it already has, LGPL. It seems he just didn't want to release the source yet in order to polish everything. After all 21.01 is an alpha version and there is also some trouble with compiling it on some platforms.

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