I hear the "you shouldn't have to learn how your engine works just to drive a car" argument often used to counter my insistence on learning git's internals to understand its externals.

My response: git is a tool for professionals. Racecar drivers should definitely understand how engines work. Amateur users of version control systems are using the undo and redo buttons in a Google Document. Git is a professional tool and if you're a professional then you have a professional obligation to learn your tools properly.

@sir

> I hear the "you shouldn't have to learn how your engine works just to drive a car" argument often used to counter my insistence on learning git's internals to understand its externals.
>
> My response: git is a tool for professionals. Racecar drivers should definitely understand how engines work.

I don't love this analogy – largely because I think the case for developers learning git is much *stronger* than the case for racecar drivers learning about engines

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@codesections I cannot get behind this argument for a different reason.

*Of course* people should have learned git internals when/if they were learning git to seriously use it. Do people (systems engineers) disagree? Have they not learned git internals? ("You should" implies they haven't yet, doesn't it?) It sounds to me like @sir is preaching to the choir.

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