Most tech are frustratingly incapable of predicting the future, and 2006's 2.0 is no exception. But it holds up better than many, and identifies four key themes still relevant today: - by states, and by code - competing , and latent ambiguity.

Next book is "Thinking in Systems", by Donella H. Meadows, because eventually I'll have to back up all my mutterings about "self-reinforcing behaviors".

Next book is "Winning the Green New Deal: Why We Must, How We Can", edited by Varshini Prakash and Guido Girgenti of the Sunrise Movement. A collection of essays by environmentalists and policy folks.

Next read is "Concrete Economics" by Stephen S. Cohen and J. Bradford DeLong.

First book from the reading list.

I finished "The Power" by Naomi Alderman today.

I didn't enjoy the read, but it was thought provoking. The central thesis of the book seemed to be, "our society is based on power, and if women were stronger than men we would see the same oppressive dynamics we see now, reversed."

That's a grim thought.

Next book is The Entrepreneurial State, by Mariana Mazzucato.

I'm going to try not to overdo it with the social notes. It's a library book due back soon, and I'm not sure writing down everything helps me absorb the content.

Still, I'm excited to dive into another book.

This pretty little number is my next read, the Verso Book of Dissent.

Thanks to @mayel for the recommendation. I think I have a different edition, but it still looks good.

I didn't realize when i bought it that the book was written 2006, but I'm still pretty interested to read "Producing Open Source Software," by Karl Fogel.

I just joined an software company and I have a lot to learn.

Next read: I've got the audiobook of Margaret Atwood's "The Testaments". Figured I'd intersperse the heavy stuff with *some* fiction.

Next (current) read: if Beale Street Could Talk, by James Baldwin

Just finished the Tombs of Atuan by . The whole thing, cover to cover, on . The Internet rules.

Next book is "City at World's End" by Edmond Hamilton, a 1950s book hosted on .

Thus far, it's classic 1950s fare. A square-jawed team of white man scientists are flung into the far future along with their town. The local government is weak, the women are frail and must be protected.

For all that the premise is interesting - reminds me of "The Night Land" and "The City and the Stars" - post post post apocalypse cities surviving on doomed worlds.

Next read is "The Buried Giant," by Kazuo Ishiguro.

Post-Aurthurian legend where nobody can form long term memories.

Next read is Andrew Krivak's "The Bear". A father- daughter post-apocalypse tale.

Next Read is "Kiss The Ground" by Josh Tickell.

I started a job in October trying to help farmers (and other people living on the land) practice . We've got to store that and save the world.

More of an essay than a book, but my next read is "Making Kin with the Machines" by Jason Edward Lewis, Noelani Arista, Archer Pechawis, and Suzanne Kite. jods.mitpress.mit.edu/pub/lewi

Next book is "Let It Rot!: The Gardener's Guide to Composting" by Stu Campbell.

Yay! Excited to get into "All We Can Save" by @ayanaeliza and Katherine K. Wilkinson

Next read, this time with the kiddo. "We Are The Water Protectors"

Beautiful illustrations. The right story.

The , , and Working Group (EDIWG) at , published a white paper called "Ethical Exploration and the Role of Planetary Protection in Disrupting Colonial Practices" and it calls for incorporating practices as we explore other worlds. arxiv.org/abs/2010.08344

I'm going to give this a shot! "Sustaining Lake Superior" by Nancy Langston is about a mass effort of and in a time of .

sustaininglakesuperior.com/

Just finished "The Fall of Gondolin" by . More moved than I expected to do.

Before that "Deus X" by Norman Spinrad was the read. I first read it in high school, dusted it off as a pallet cleanser. A cyberpunk novel musing on the soul of software while the global ecosystem collapses.

"Mission Economy" by Mariana Mazzucato. A call for stakeholder, rather than shareholder .

"Although the goverments of many countries have spent staggering sums to keep their economies on life support during both the financial crisis and, more recently, the health pandemic, the neo-liberal economics which took hold in the Thatcher –Reagan era continue heavily to influence thinking, which still portrays government as clunky, bureaucratic machines that suppress the animal spirits of the wealth-creating private sector – no matter how much the latter are bailed out crisis after crisis."

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Mazzucato argues that big missions help to reverse the trend away from community obligations to individual advancement, "by involving citizens in solving grand societal challenges and creating wide civic excitement about the power of collective innovation".

"With the mission, citizens were inspired, but were not involved in designing the mission itself. That makes sense... for purely technological missions. But for missions that are societal – linked to growth, healthy living, the future of mobility or solving the digital divide – it is essential that different voices participate from the start to help think through the mission's implications for ordinary people and modify it to involve and benefit citizens as much as possible."

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