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Why would I chose freeBSD over linux?
tbh freeBSD scares me.

@AndreC having worked with both I can tell you that FreeBSD isn't that scary after a while. It's just a smaller world, where you rely on very standard solutions from a tightly knit community. The company I work for used it almost religiously for years.
Where it falls short is simply the fact that it's not Linux. While there are equivalent (and better, from several point of view) containerization technologies in its kernel, something like docker never happened nor the whole ecosystem around it.

@AndreC You chose what works best for you. "Why should I use $OS?" is already asking the wrong question. Think about the problem you want to address first, not why you should use something.

@raichoo Yes definitely agree with that. I've always stuck with windows and Linux so I was wondering if there was any benefits rather than just personal preference. Like windows has default support for a lot of apps, while I find Linux really snappy and has a great update system where you don't have to restart. If there's something cool about Free BSD I might try it out sometime. 😃

@AndreC @raichoo the coolness I searched for and found at #FreeBSD:

32bit support for my old but well running netbook

only the programs I choose aboard -- meaning you'll have to think what you need and install it. back to basic software that does the job (I do only text editing)

fun to learn to set up your environment/system/box. as a side effect it improves your searching skills, logical thinking and frustration tolerance ;-)

stability

@meine @AndreC To me it was basically "transparency" if that makes sense. Having the source code for the entire OS and not just the kernel, combined with dtrace gives me so much more insight in what's going on on the system. Also having tight ZFS integration (which is not tacked on like in all the Linux distros) is neat. Things just fit together, better than with Linux. At least for my taste.

@meine @raichoo
Sound like it would be a great OS for a server especially with better ZFS support. I think I might try to install it in a VM and figure out how it works.

@AndreC @meine Yeah, it's a really great server OS, especially things like jails are great and have been around for around 20 years, so way before things like containers became popular. Personally I also run it on my laptops, because it's what I know best ^^.

@raichoo @meine I just checked out some pictures and videos of it today, might take some time to figure out all the syntax and features. But I actually love the GUI it looks incredibly modern, almost a bit mac os esque. I definitely think it's worth a try on desktop as well considering I love that GUI layout.

@AndreC @raichoo I don't know about ZFS and servers and stuff, #FreeBSD is just my workhorse. working in TTY, socializing in GUI, just cwm and a browser, nothing else

on the GUI: any decent OS lets you choose your DE and/or WM. AFAIK there is no 'FBSD looks', it's just what you want, what you make/copy of it.

@AndreC @raichoo choosing whatever environment you want can be strange, as 'default' computers give only one option to use.

compare a true #FOSS desktop environment and/or window manager with choosing a new bike, car or friend: what do I like, need, and install it! no strings attached

the challenge with a new #FreeBSD box is the black screen you start with. it's all up to your wishes.

quite a change in this otherwise so 'free world'... !!!

@meine @AndreC Indeed. Your GUI can look the way you want it to (depending on how much effort you want to put into it). But that's the same with most Linux Distros. I have written my own compositor/window manager hikari.acmelabs.space (largely inspired by `cwm`) mainly because I wanted to, but things like Gnome, KDE and a host of window managers are also available. FreeBSD differs in how it works rather than what it looks like (which is not that different from most Linux Distros).

@raichoo @meine
Well that makes a lot of sense. Looks like ive got a lot to learn now :)

@AndreC @meine It's easy to get lost in all of this stuff. Don't worry too much, using an unusual setup for the sake of it is not a badge of honor ^^ It just makes life harder for no reason. Find something that solves your specific use case, there will always be someone who will claim that something else is "better". Your requirements will change as time progresses. It can be a super fun journey. Try out as much as you can, in the end something will stick for one reason or another ^^.

@AndreC @raichoo here are a few sources that helped me a lot in setting up my box:

* #FreeBSD Handbook (freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-)

* @vermaden Desktop series (vermaden.wordpress.com/freebsd)

* Cooltrainer setup -- mind that 12 needs some things differently (cooltrainer.org/a-freebsd-desk)

* the FreeBSD forum -- first RTFM, then ask here (forums.freebsd.org/)

@meine @raichoo
Wow thank you it's definitely worth looking at now, maybe I'll really like it and make the switch! I definitely have a talent for making my life difficult so might as well learn a different OS!

@AndreC @meine Yeah same, but sometimes living with certain restrictions can actually be a pretty good catalyst to become better at certain things. So "making your life harder" can sometimes be a good thing if the dosage is right.

@AndreC @raichoo it can help if you have a second computer/laptop at hand. 1) to look up things during installation, and 2) the psychological effect of knowing that whatever you can continue other things

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